TEASER || HOME || STORE || VIETNAM VETS || HISTORY || LETTER || NEWS || RADIO SHOWS || REVIEWS || TESTIMONIALS || CREDITS || GALLERY || LINKS ||

Created By Lloyd Marcus

A SPECIAL THANKS TO MR. LLOYD MARCUS FOR THE USE OF THIS SONG 'WELCOME HOME'

JOHN LEBERT AND JACK MARINO WANT TO THANK ALL THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE WHO HAVE PURCHASED THE DVD OF FOROGTTEN HEROES AND TOOk THE TIME TO SEND US THESE WONDERFUL REVIEWS. THE FOLLOWING REVIEWS ARE FROM PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER AMERICA AND AROUND THE WORLD THAT HAVE PURCHASED THE FORGOTTEN HEROES DVD !

FORGOTTEN HEROES REVIEW

Having served in the Marine Corps’ Combined Action Program (CAP) in Vietnam in 1970 -71, I have always been motivated to call attention to Hollywood’s disgraceful-misrepresentation of Vietnam vets in films and on television. To me, and many other Vietnam vets, Hollywood didn’t want Americans and the world to see the full image of American veterans who served in the war. All too often it seemed that Hollywood wanted to show Vietnam vets as crazed, explosive drug addict, heartless killers.

Back in the mid-70s, under the therapeutic hobby name of CAProductions, I started to write my experiences of living and serving (24/7) in a Vietnamese peasant-farming village; not because I felt that I was a hero, but because I knew I had served with a bunch of honorable heroes. I was tired and disgusted of seeing and hearing about the stereotypical characters that Hollywood was portraying in their movies like Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Rambo.

I wanted to show the real human side of America’s Vietnam vets. I wanted Americans to see characters, which highlighted the dangers, the loneliness, the frustrations, the kindness, the friendships, the intense brotherhood and especially the sometimes strange fun the vets had with each other. I also wanted to show the war from the peasant farming-village level. How Americans truthfully interacted with the world's poorest. For various reasons, my CAProductions project never came to life.

But over the years, I did learn about other more successful film attempts to bring out Vietnam vets as honorable heroes; which they were. One such project that I greatly enjoyed is ‘Forgotten Heroes.’ I love the back story how a group of forgotten Hollywood movers,Executive Producer John R. Lebert, producer/director by Jack Marino, pushed their movie to completion against all odds, when the rest of Hollywood fought against them. Their struggle was the same struggle most Vietnam vets had over the decades. I watched their movie “Forgotten Heroes” and enjoyed it. I enjoyed the brave and honorable characters. But most of all, I really enjoy the brave and honorable commonality Vietnam vets have with everyone involved with the film “Forgotten Heroes.”

The title fits so many patriots. I recommend seeing it. It brings patriots back to an almost forgotten stage in Hollywood’s history.

- Lance Corporal John "Jack" Cunningham, USMC Duc Duc Refugee Village, An Hoa Valley Vietnam, 1970 - 71

"However, films like Forgotten Heroes, if given a nudge and a push, will help bring America back.


The film is ostensibly about Vietnam … but I take it on its own terms.


Forgotten Heroes is about America’s ultimately Biblical victory over each and every evil on earth, from universal fear and prejudice to the ultimate monstrosity of world communism and any form of terrorism you’d like to try on her.


The center of gravity in the film is William Smith’s mesmerizing performance as the defecting Soviet General.
With a face off of Mt. Rushmore,  we listen to this Old Testament prophet the way we should have listened to Abraham Lincoln while he lived.


His examination of not only the plight he is in, but the one which the world is in is delivered in his wonderfully worn and beaten voice.
There are other Grade A performances: those of The Cowboy and The Venice Beach God of Surfing come to my mind.


Such classic American categories are throughout this clandestine adventure into the NVA and Viet Cong hideouts of Cambodia..
Yes, Jack Marino’s version of a Platoon is the entire American Rainbow Family.
It is a guerilla tribute to the greatness of American guerillas.


You won’t forget it, I assure you … and, after the most disturbing moment begins to sift through your consciousness, you will begin to see the film as a measure of not only American courage but her divine irresistibility.
You won’t regret having taken the time."


"Forgotten Heroes is actually unforgettable."

- Michael Moriarty - Actor/writer /Big Hollywood

Hey Jack, here's my review, and thanks for handnote and all. I appreciate what you do.
  
"As a compatriot in indie film making, in pro-American depictions, I found this film to be compelling to watch. I was immediately surprised by the caliber of sets, props, background, and attention to detail. The dialog & acting were well done, not cringeworthy as many indie films are. Actually the scope of sets and characters did make me go wow, this isn't some indie thing but a real production.
 
William Smith gives a surprisingly low key terse depiction of the Russian general, which is a good thing! And when the mission began in the story, I was like whoah, its non stop from here on out. I was also surprised at the few key lines that gave William Smith's character and the other characters' their moments. Very succinct and dry... which I like. No over drawn monologues or over acting emotional eye rolls! And the two guys before and at end, remembering the story... GUT WRENCHING!"
 
Good job, I hope you can do more.
 

Ron Smorynski - CG Producer, WorldofGrim Productions

'Forgotten Heroes,

Jack Marino's film on Viet Nam is not simply a war movie. Breaking from the Hollywood tradition of showing our brave fighting men as baby raping, drug addicted killers Jack has created an homage to the true spirit of the American military man and the honor with which they carry out their orders. War is an ugly yet necessary evil, yet in the midst of the campaigns, hidden in the fog of war are tales of sacrifice borne of camaraderie, honor, valor and character proving the greatness of the human spirit.

Jack has brought these qualities to his film, countering the depraved image Hollywood has too long foisted upon us and he has reminded us of those qualities which make defending liberty, once the dust has settled and the dead honored, one of the most noble and selfless endeavors man in which man can engage. Watch Forgotten Heroes while keeping in mind that those who go to war to defend liberty for all are the true heroes, willing to sacrifice even their lives so people they will never know can know the glory of living free, and that they do so without the need of your gratitude thus proving no man can show a greater love than to willingly lay down his life for his fellow man.

-Kender MacGowan - Radio Host - Poet & Actor

One of the best films I have seen in ages. Jack Marino is a real patriot to his country and this can be seen through the characters in his film Forgotten Heroes. Forgotten Heroes is a film about the Vietnam War it is really nicely put together piece that shows you how men became soldiers and soldiers become heroes. Being a New Zealander, I never knew that the Russians were involved in this war, fighting alongside the Vietcong; it is a real eye opener for me. Acting is good with former body builder and TV and movie star William Smith in the role of the Russian General whom turns against his countrymen and decided to help out the US. I strongly recommend this film to everyone, and If you buy it some of your money goes to THE AMERICAN VETERANS DISABLED FOR LIFE MEMORIAL FUND, a really nice gesture from the film's maker Jack Marino.

-Patrick L. Walsh - Projectionist - New Zealander

From the intro to the emotional ending, Forgotten Heroes is filled with an understanding of the courage and sacrifice of the men serving in Vietnam. Marino does not cater to the expectations of Hollywood (who put out such derogatory films as Full Metal Jacket and Green Zone) but shows the vets in a light generally rejected by popular entertainment. This film would be a fantastic gift for vets or military enthusiasts alike and surely a good addition to your own film library

-Jonathan L. Morris - Missouri

Loved the movie. So many films about the Vietnam War are PLATOON or APOCALYPSE NOW. Those Vets never got the respect they deserved for, when America called, answered that call. People get all queasy because in nearly ten years in Iraq and Afghanistan were lost some 4,000 troops. Now I feel for any family who lost a member in combat. In Vietnam it was like 400-500 a week. In the the year of the Tet Offensive we lost 16,000 men.

Secondly, I am a big fan of Big Bill Smith and collect movies he has been in -- including the tv series LARADO. If they had done Conan in the 1970's he would have been perfect! Best!

-Lew Cabos

This isn't your run of the mill druggy Vet film. It's a very real dipiction of what real life was in Vietnam. The action and gun battles literally blew me away!! This is truely a heroic film with a superb Musical Score. "Forgotten Heros" will NOT be forgotten!!:)If you liked Platoon you'll love Forgotten Heros!!

-Kimberly Ricci - Boston Mass

'GI Joes are not real American Heroes, 'Forgotten Heroes' are!!!'


When I firstly heared about movie called 'Forgotten Heroes' I hadn't any idea what kind of movie it will be, but since I found out it came from Jack Marino, producer and co writer of amazing 'Killzone' I was sure 'Forgotten Heroes' will be one hell of the movie. To be honest 'Forgotten Heroes' turned out to be not just great war flick It simply is one of the best War movies ever made and remember it's not an easy job to made such a movie with very limited budget. 'Forgotten Heroes' is not just ordinary movie about bunch of soldiers on a mission, it's actually very deep picture with excellent suspense and intelligent, well written dialogues. Everything that wouldn't be possible without very good acting provided by most of the cast. William Smith as russian general did his job in amazing way. He's more than soldier, he is a man, worried about his nation and the way his government has chosen. Bill Smith always was one of the best actors of all time, but in 'Forgotten Heroes' he did something more than just great acting. He become his character from the movie like never before and never after. This role was simply written for him and I don't think any actor could do it better than he did.


Another excelent performance was delivered by David Campbell ('Killzone', 'Deadly Prey' etc) who really deserved to be top actor with his charisma and abilities. All in all everyone from the cast did their part very good and convincing and such a shame most of them never had an opportunity to be in any movie again.


Jack Marino portrayed his characters for a movie as good boys and real heroes just because these people were heroes, they fought for their country and loosing their lives in Vietnam and many people seems to forget about it. So many brave soldiers died in this green hell and Jack made 'Forgotten Heroes' for these who never came back and for these who came back and weren't treated with respect they deserved.


I can't really say anyhing more about 'Forgotten Heroes' because it really needs to be seen to be belived. So I suggest you to buy the dvd from the website and support disabled veterans and remember - subject of the movie is still actual. Then they were fighting in Nam, today we have Iraq, Afghanistan and God who knows what else future will bring...

I am very proud to have this touching movie in my dvd collection.

-Fabio Soldani - Warszawa, Poland

Hi Jack,


So sorry for taking so long to get back to you on your great film - we have been going non-stop with the Christmas thing that I cannot even see straight anymore!
 
But it's time to take a breather so here I am.  Both my husband and my self agree that yours is the finest depiction of the Vietnam war and the brave American troops who served our country so well there.  We had grown so sick and tired of nearly every Vietnam film out there showing the Americans as mean, evil baby-killers and mother-rapers and whatever else the film makers could think of that was vile and despicable.  It was so good to see our guys and gals shown as who they really were - as honorable soldiers representing the greatest nation on earth, giving their all to protect and preserve freedom and liberty from those who really were (and are still) the scum of the earth.  It was so refreshing to see our troops being shown as human beings with all the feelings and emotions of normal people who found themselves all of a sudden thrust into a scenario that a lot of people out there probably wouldn't even last more than a day or two in before losing it.  Our soldiers were asked to do a job and they met the challenge head-on, once again showing the world just what Americans are made of with grit and determination that would not back down from any enemy - no matter how big or how strong.  Our troops gave us back here in the States plenty of reason to be proud of them, and I think that is all that  most of them wanted from us - that we stand up and be proud of them for the job well done, just as they were so proud to be there and answer Duty's call....because that is what was asked of them. 
 
Unfortunately, not everyone felt the way that myself and many, many more of my fellow Americans felt.  Not everyone saw this war as an "honorable" war - and  instead of praising our troops and making them feel that the job they did was one that they could hold their head up for, but instead made so many of them to hang their head in shame, calling them horrible names, spitting on them and worst of all, ignoring them and making them fell that what they had done for us, risking it all, for Freedom's sake was instead something that had only wasted lives and cost us money.  There were no ticker-tape parades down at Time's Square welcoming them home and lifting them up for a job well done, but instead they were met with protestors screaming obscenities at them and calling them horrible things.
 
But you know all this and probably experienced your own un-fair share of it yourself (although I sincerely hope that you were spared any of this stuff).  I was raised, thankfully, by parents from the old school who believed in America and all the good that she stands for, and I learned at an early age that our troops were probably some of the bravest people on earth and they stood for all that was good and that they would do whatever it took to keep America safe, and because of this upbringing, I grew up loving our troops and felt an overwhelming sense of awe whenever I would see them - looking so handsome and proud in their uniforms that my heart would melt and tears would come to my eyes just to see them and realise who they were.
 
When the Vietnam war came along and all of the bad things began happening to our troops - not by our enemies but by our own citizens, I didn't know what to think.  Then Hollywood started putting out all of the awful movies that were supposed to be "the truth" about what really went on over there, I soon found myself being really angry with Hollywood and the "leftists" in this country, and I just couldn’t understand why someone didn't make a movie about what it was really was about and bring honor to our troops.
 
Well Jack, you have finally done it!  This movie is what has been needed since the war started.  A movie that showed the hardships from every aspect that our troops encountered over there and shwed us back here in the States just what they were up against and shwed us how they met these challenges honorably and did what they needed to do to get the job done.  My husband and I both salute you for a great job well done, and are telling all we know to please buy the movie and help you guys keep it going - it's a great start in finally getting the word out about the truth of Vietnam.
 
God bless you for taking up the torch and meeting the challenge head-on. And may our Vietnam Troops finally begin to receive the real recognition that they deserve because of your endeavor. Thanks,

Michelle & Don Cleave - Dec 19, 2009

Jack, this movie is awesome. I watched the movie as soon as I received it in the mail. Your portrayal of the Vietnam War and it's heroes are unlike any I have seen in other higher budget films. I was instantly drawn into the characters and felt like I was right there in combat with them. I laughed during the lighter scenes and cried for the sacrifices they made in the name of freedom.
 
Growing up in the 60's and 70's I was aware of the protesting of the Vietnam War and the men that fought in it. I never fully appreciated the sacrifices they made until I had the privilege to watch Forgotten Heroes. Your film took me to the battlefield with them and showed me up close and personal what it was like for them. They never received the praise that they deserved, until now.
 
Thank you so much for telling me about your film in the BTR chat because I may have never known such a accurately portrayed film ever existed. This is a must see film for all veterans, their families and all men and women thinking of enlisting. This movie should be on the big screen. I hope it gets the recognition it so deserves.
 

- Holly Phillips, Linthicum, Maryland

Passionately produced and directed by Jack Marino, "Forgotten Heroes" is a film difficult to forget. In the one-sided world of Hollywood politics, especially regarding films concerning our involvements in war, Marino's film is a refreshing perspective on the true heroics that went into our battle against Communist North Vietnam. That war spurred a generation of activists to decry our just participation in a conflict against a ruthless regime, spouting platitudes of peace, while turning its back on the predicted and inevitable mass murder by North Vietnam and the Khmer Rouge once we retreated.

"Forgotten Heroes" depicts exactly why it was a just participation, and now after three decades of Hollywood's biased spin on the subject, we can, through this film, begin to appreciate the honorable sacrifices made by our young men and women of the Vietnam War. Filled with scenes of valor, pathos, and grim battle sequences, "Forgotten Heroes" takes us through one company's odessy to rescue a Russian general (impressively portrayed by veteran actor, William Smith) who is valuable to our cause.

By the film's end, Marino has left us with a renewed appreciation for what our troops suffered on the battlefield, and later at the hands of Hollywood.

- Robert & Annette Florczak - Los Angeles, CA

FORGOTTEN HEROES is a well-produced independent movie highlighting the valor of the men who served in Vietnam. It tells the story of Ramon Lopez, who is newly added to a platoon of Marines ordered to go into Cambodia to extract a Russian general named Gregori Zelenkov. At the very beginning of the movie, Ramon Lopez is reminiscing at the Vietnam Memorial with Robert Mills, the only other survivor of the expedition. Thus, the entire movie is told in flashback.


As Ramon arrives in the camp, the audience gets to know each member of the team, including Lt. Paul Holden, Robert Mills, Cowboy, Nick Govostes, Sully, Darryl Huckins, Prophet, Rossetti, and Deluca. They each reveal their prejudices and their passions. And, Ramon suffers from the normal hazing of a new member of the team. The soldiers successfully land in Cambodia and extract the general in the middle of the night, but an elite troop of Russian paratroopers starts tracking them down. In the process of the battles, there are many redemptive acts where soldiers are willing to lay down their lives for not only their friends, but also their enemies.


The opening of FORGOTTEN HEROES is slow and dated, but once the action starts, the movie is very well directed and produced. There is an intense sense of jeopardy from the moment the platoon leaves for Cambodia. The characters elicit emotion and hold the viewer’s interest. William Smith’s performance as General Gregori Zelenkov is outstanding. The movie as a whole gives an accurate and positive portrait of the heroes of Vietnam. It has a very real, down to earth feel about it.


This is not a movie for children. There’s too much foul language and some racist jokes. However, it also has some strong Christian content, answered prayer and many redemptive acts. The filmmaker Jack Marino should be commended for making a terrific war movie on an independent budget.


As an exceptional gesture, the Producers of “Forgotten Heroes” are generously contributing 25% of their gross revenues ($5 from each DVD sold) to the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial Fund to honor all of America’s Veterans. 

-Dr, Ted Baehr - MOVIEGUIDE

- A Family Guide to Movies and Entertainment

Jack,
 
After finally watching "Forgotten Heroes" after purchasing it several weeks ago (my DVD player went out, took me a while to get a new one) I am more impressed, with your ability to bring to the front, the plight of Vietnam Veterans everywhere.  Showing Vietnam Veterans, not to be the drug crazed, fragging  soldiers, like some of the past movies of the Vietnam war, but the young men of an age when Patriotic duty to service to country, was a norm. (Marines weren't drafted, they volunteered)


Forgotten Heroes, also, to me, portrays the sense of brotherhood, that a squad has with each man, whether they were NFG's or "short-timers"  When the Hero fell on the grenade, not knowing if it was a dud or not, impressing the Russian General with disbelief, that one soldier would do that, to protect his brother in arms.  How many times, during the Vietnam War, did we hear of that actually happening? They are truly "Forgotten Heroes". 


I have been to the "Wall" in Washington DC. While I never knew any of the men and women listed there, I felt a kinship, with each and every one of them. A kinship that left me in AWE of those that gave their lives, in protecting and preserving, our way of life.. No one, who has never served in our Military, could ever understand, that kinship and Brotherhood mentality.


I have many many Vietnam Veteran friends, from the US AIr Force, US Marines, US Army, and the US Navy, I've watched many of them die from the diseases borne home with them, unknowing their country unleashed on them through the use of Agent Orange, and some denied benefits, for not having "boots on the ground" in Vietnam, even though their service as support units to the Marines and Army/Airforce brought them into harms way, too.


I am a Bluewater Navy Vietnam Veteran, having served on the USS Decatur (DDG-31) two tours in Vietnam waters. We steamed planeguard for the aircraft carriers, picking up downed pilots that made it to Northern Search and Rescue,or skeetered off the flight deck during landings,  steamed on the gunline firing shore bombardments, and patrolling the waters of the Tonkin Gulf.  I served as the "Oil King, on the Decatur, overseeing and assigning stations during the refueling operations, testing and treating of boilers, and many other duties, normally assigned to an E-6 or above (I was an E-4)  heck of a job for a 20 yr old.
 
I wouldn't trade one day of my service with my brothers in arms, for anything in the world.. And even though the Department of Veterans Affairs classifies me currently as a Vietnam "ERA" Veteran, since I didn't have "boots on the ground" in Vietnam,  I am proud of my service in the US Navy, and my Vietnam Service.

And proud to call, Jack Marino, and our many other Vietnam Veterans,  a brother in arms.
 
AND TO ALL VIETNAM VETERANS, WELCOME HOME, BROTHERS AND SISTERS
 

-James M. Rigsby (Papaw) - BT3 USS DECATUR (DDG-31) USN-R - 1970-1974

Hello Jack,

FORGOTTEN HEROES is a fantastic film that I am so glad you have made. It's message is one that needs to be told and heard by this country, a message that has been drowned out by the warped and distorted messages of "Platoon", "Casualties of War", etc.  I think it is a very authentic film - it depicts the Marines as Marines tend to be, but, not warped murderers and rapists, etc., that seems to be the message of Oliver Stone, who ironically dedicated his film to those who served there, but, then proceeds to trash them.  I particularly liked the little speech of the Russian General equating our liberals and the Soviet "armchair revolutionaries." 

It presents a story of sacrifice that is seldom fully conveyed.   I joined the Marines in 1970 and trained in the Marine's version of ROTC called "PLC" - Platoon Leaders Class -- where you go to boot camp for two summers during undergraduate years, but, don't drill or meet on campus.  At the end of our second summer in '71, my battalion commander, Major Charles Robb (who later became Governor and Senator from Virginia - he married Lyndon Johnson's daughter after serving on White House guard duty), told us that it was the President's [Nixon's] prerogative to send in Marines first and withdraw Marines, and that he was now withdrawing Marines and would not replace those units, so, although we trained to fight in VietNam, I was never sent.  I subsequently took the law option and served 4 yrs active duty as JAG counsel. 

I believe you have accurately portrayed the unparalleled camaderie that develops among the troops -- whatever happens, you can NEVER let your buddies down... it is as Admiral Nimitz said, which appears on the USMC Memorial which you show at the beginning of the film, "where uncommon valor was a common virtue."    I have heard of such missions into Cambodia.  You have done an excellent job and I hope this movie receives widespread dissemination because it is not only a story that needs to be told, but, one that needs to be seen by a widespread audience.   Blessings to you for making this film.  I know that you have paid a professional price in Hollywood for this, and I salute you for going against the grain. 

-Benjamin Sley, Major, U.S. Marine Corps, Judge Advocate,

-1st Marine Brigade; Yrs of Service: 1970-71 (PLC); 1975-1979.


Mr. Marino,
 
It was great listening to you on Blog Talk Radio last night. Your perseverance and dedication to conservative values was refreshing and inspiring to listen to.
 
I was finally able to watch the movie Forgotten Heroes after purchasing it several weeks ago. You see I am a Vietnam veteran, so issues from that war still fog my daily life.
 
At first I was skeptical about the movie because of all the lousy movies from the past that portrayed Nam vets as drug crazed psychopathic murderers, rapists, and baby killers. None of that happened during my tours in country beginning in 1966 and ending early 1968. Although I was designated a non-combatant, we were a part of a support group that helped keep our brothers, the USMC, supplied with things like "C" rations, beer, and things that went boom and bang. Not only that but we ferried injured and KIA, even civilians. We were the river buses that ran the gauntlet every day, rain or shine, no matter what the enemy or mother nature threw at us, we did our jobs.
 
We did see some combat but mostly it was the VC and NVA attempting to blow our boats out of the water through various means, including mortar shelling, rocket and RPG attacks.
Sometime after the war our status was changed to combatants, but I haven't pursued any of that since my honorable discharge.
 
At any rate, I did watch it and was pleasntly surprised to see Vietnam veterans as what they were and are. Honorable men and women performing a very difficult and dangerous duty to their country under the most extreme of conditions and weather.

Thank you does not say enough but it's all I have, so thank you from the bottom of my heart for making this movie.
 
As a side note I am involved with a group called ACTIVE. It is headed by Pat Dollard who at one time in his life was a Hollywood agent. The man decided to quit his high life and went to Iraq with the grunts from the USMC. He has a great story.

His web site is here; http://patdollard.com/

To read about ACTIVE go here; http://patdollard.com/2009/03/the-active-mission-statement-is-here/
 
Our group has been commisioned with restoring the Republic and return us to recognition of the Constitution as our founding document.
To date it is a peaceful endeavor and we pray it stays that way but many combat vets from the Vietnam era right through to todays young warriors have joined and are prepared for whatever may come.

I am willing to give my life to protect and defend this land that I love. Many years ago I swore an oath to do just that. It was a blood oath without an expiration date attached, so as far as me and many others are concerned it is still in force and valid.
 
In light of your activity to promote your wonderful movie and based upon what you said on the radio I feel this might be an endeavor you would be interested in and at the same time a way to promote the movie "Forgotten Heroes."
Any patriot, big or small, rich or poor, young or old that loves America and all she stands for is welcome in our ranks. In fact it would be an honor to have you among us Mr. Marino.

You have dedicated much of your life supporting a vitally important cause and mission. For that, me and many, many of my brothers and sisters in uniform will be eternally grateful.
 

Semper Fi. Ever vigilant. Blessings to you and yours,

- Dean Bremkamp

 
 

“Forgotten Heroes”

by Yankee Mom


As some of you who read my blog (bless you!) know, I’m a member of Rolling Thunder.  The Vietnam War was my war.  My contemporaries were drafted, fought, some died and some never came home.  Those that did make it home were shown nothing less than total disrespect by the anti-war protesters and Congress.  Many myths about the war have become “facts” and the Vietnam Vets heroic actions have been lost these past 40 years.

I was listening to Kit Lange’s Blog Talk Radio show, The Frontline, Saturday night (3/14) and she had a terrific interview going with the director and main force behind “Forgotten heroes”.

In 1985, a film maker by the name of Jack Marino decided that the real story of those who fought in this war and what they actually were like, needed to be told.  It’s not a documentary; it’s a story.  But one that is the polar opposite of so many Hollywood movies of the Vietnam War.  You know, the ones that show the Soldiers and Marines as bloodthirsty murderers and depraved and crazed killers of women and babies.


From the website, “www.forgottenheroesthemovie.com”:

In 1986 after watching the film “Platoon”, Jack began to realize that since John Wayne’s “Green Berets”, Hollywood seems increasingly reluctant to say anything positive or portray in a heroic sense anyone that fought in the Vietnam war. He felt he had to do something to counter all the negativism that seemed so pervasive within the city limits of Tinsel Town towards America’s war vets. He had been kicking around this idea of a World War II style film in a Vietnam setting for some time.

FORGOTTEN HEROES is unlike any Vietnam War film made before or since. Jack’s pitch line for the film was, “Objective Burma meets Kelly’s Heroes.” “I wanted to portray on film that generation who answered JFK’s call to defend freedom anywhere and anytime.”
 
Every Sunday possible during my childhood, my Dad and I would spend a few hours watching all the great black and white WWII movies together.  Still, decades later, when I came home for a visit, we would fight the war together again in front of the TV.  (He finally got cable.)  John Wayne, Errol Flynn, Van Johnson, Audie Murphy and so many more, are a major part of my childhood memories.

As I was listening to Jack Marino talk about why he made this movie, I ordered it.  I have missed the great war movies that were pro-American and showed heroic actions of our troops.  My husband and I have pretty much stopped watching movies coming out of Hollywood.  We’re just plain sick and tired of sitting down to let go of our daily stuff and be entertained to find we’re being lectured on the liberal’s agenda of hating America and/or our Military.  There are so many wonderful and inspring stories about our Military out there just waiting to be told.  But the media can’t even bring itself to report on our Finest unless it’s report after report about torture (mostly bogus), civilian deaths (so many found to be untrue) and how “demoralized” and “broken” our troops are.  So, to think Hollywood (the bastion of Liberalism and “Blame America First”) would even consider making a movie that showed the truth of all the great things and personal sacrifice our troops are willing  to stand up and carry out ~ well, I’m not holding my breath on that!  (fyi ~ many can be found at Great Americans.  Go on over and read about the Heroes this country prduces.)

If you feel as we do, please go on over to “Forgotten Heroes” and buy a DVD for yourself and maybe a copy or two for others you know who would appreciate a good pro-American, pro-Military movie.

Thanks, Jack!

- Yankee Mom Blog

This entry was posted on Monday, March 16th, 2009 at 9:23 am and is filed under movies. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

"Forgotten Heroes: Setting the Record Straight about Vietnam Veterans"

 
In a refreshing departure from the usual Hollywood fare, Jack Marino’s film presents a positive portrayal of the most maligned members of our military.
 
It may not have the big name actors, the lavish on-location sets or the fêted Hollywood directors, but Jack Marino’s film Forgotten Heroes possesses something money can’t buy—a willingness to paint an accurate picture of Vietnam veterans. Disgusted by liberal Tinsel Town producers with an agenda, not to mention access to nearly unfathomable amounts of money, Marino set out to create an alternative to military-bashing films like Platoon that preached an anti-American message to an American audience forking over hard-earned money for two hours of theatrical entertainment. Long enamored of World War II-era films, Marino endeavored to create a Green Beret-style tribute “to the generation that answered President Kennedy’s call to defend freedom anytime and anywhere.”
 
 
The result is an engaging drama that follows the mission of an eclectic squadron of Marines as they attempt to rescue a Russian General who has defected to the United States. Representing the ethnic and racial diversity of America, this group of heroes includes a blond-haired surfer boy from Venice Beach, a young Latino from Los Angeles, a wise-cracking Italian-American from Brooklyn, and a stocky cowboy from Oklahoma. In keeping with the film’s tagline, “it was a time that turned boys into men and men into heroes,” when we first meet our core characters, they appear to behave more like frat boys than American soldiers, playing drinking games and fantasizing about girls on the beach.
 
However, we get the first glimpse of real brotherhood upon the arrival of new recruit Ramon, fresh out of boot camp and unaccustomed to the haunting “smell of the Nam.” Young Ramon has never been in combat, but gets his first taste of the grim reality of war when a fellow soldier named De Luca—hours away from flying home with honor—is blown up by a grenade planted by the his Vietnamese shoe-shine boy. Devastated by the loss of their friend, the squad nonetheless rises to the occasion when the dreaded word “Cambodia” turns out to be the site for the critical mission they’ve been assigned. When Ramon admits to a fear of being shot at, his self-appointed mentor, Leo Rossetti assists him in working through his apprehensions in one of the films simultaneously lighthearted and ominous scenes.
 
Veteran movie actor William Smith turns in a compelling performance as Russian defector General Zelenkov, a man who loves his country but not its oppressive government—a point of view rarely presented on screen by communist-lovin’ Hollywood. An honorable man, Zelenkov prevents his American rescuers from instantly killing young, militant Lieutenant Colonel Viktor Brazinski, an act of decency that puts all of their lives in jeopardy. Once awake, Brazinski calls in the Russian forces, leaving the Marines and the General no choice but to abort their helicopter rescue at the original pick-up zone and embark upon a treacherous jungle journey through enemy territory, to a secondary pick-up zone.
 
Along the way, the men transition into heroes, as they encounter an endless onslaught of horrific circumstances. In one scene, Ramon finds himself the sole protector of a Vietnamese woman and her daughter after Joe “Cowboy” Geer is shot to death by the communists he bravely fends off in order to give them a chance to escape. In another, Nick Govostos, American son of Greek immigrants, is called upon to make a gut-wrenching decision most of us will never have to confront in our lifetimes, when fellow soldier Darryl Huckins is brutally skinned alive.
 
Through it all, the men come to appreciate valor, courage, brotherhood and the price of freedom as they develop an understanding and respect for the man whose rescue comes with the highest of costs. Those who are fortunate enough to make it home in the end, have nothing but affection for their fallen heroes and the country that sent its young men into harm’s way for the cause of freedom. No wonder the power-brokers of Hollywood rejected this film!
 
Fortunately it is available as a DVD at
http://www.forgottenheroesthemovie.com/. A true patriot, Jack Marino is donating $5.00 to The American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial Fund for every copy purchased. Please support this wonderful film and our forgotten heroes!
 

By Palin - Drne Blogspot.

Thursday, March 5, 2009

Forgotten Heroes: Setting the Record Straight about Vietnam Veterans

In a refreshing departure from the usual Hollywood fare, Jack Marino’s film presents a positive portrayal of the most maligned members of our military

It may not have the big name actors, the lavish on-location sets or the fêted Hollywood directors, but Jack Marino’s film Forgotten Heroes possesses something money can’t buy–a willingness to paint an accurate picture of Vietnam veterans. Disgusted by liberal Tinsel Town producers with an agenda, not to mention access to nearly unfathomable amounts of money, Marino set out to create an alternative to military-bashing films like Platoon that preached an anti-American message to an American audience forking over hard-earned money for two hours of theatrical entertainment. Long enamored of World War II-era films, Marino endeavored to create a Green Beret-style tribute “to the generation that answered President Kennedy’s call to defend freedom anytime and anywhere.”

The result is an engaging drama that follows the mission of an eclectic squadron of Marines as they attempt to rescue a Russian General who has defected to the United States. Representing the ethnic and racial diversity of America, this group of heroes includes a blond-haired surfer boy from Venice Beach, a young Latino from Los Angeles, a wise-cracking Italian-American from Brooklyn, and a stocky cowboy from Oklahoma. In keeping with the film’s tagline, “it was a time that turned boys into men and men into heroes,” when we first meet our core characters, they appear to behave more like frat boys than American soldiers, playing drinking games and fantasizing about girls on the beach.

However, we get the first glimpse of real brotherhood upon the arrival of new recruit Ramon, fresh out of boot camp and unaccustomed to the haunting “smell of the Nam.” Young Ramon has never been in combat, but gets his first taste of the grim reality of war when a fellow soldier named De Luca–hours away from flying home with honor–is blown up by a grenade planted by the his Vietnamese shoe-shine boy. Devastated by the loss of their friend, the squad nonetheless rises to the occasion when the dreaded word “Cambodia” turns out to be the site for the critical mission they’ve been assigned. When Ramon admits to a fear of being shot at, his self-appointed mentor, Leo Rossetti assists him in working through his apprehensions in one of the films simultaneously lighthearted and ominous scenes.

Veteran movie actor William Smith turns in a compelling performance as Russian defector General Zelenkov, a man who loves his country but not its oppressive government–a point of view rarely presented on screen by communist-lovin’ Hollywood. An honorable man, Zelenkov prevents his American rescuers from instantly killing young, militant Lieutenant Colonel Viktor Brazinski, an act of decency that puts all of their lives in jeopardy. Once awake, Brazinski calls in the Russian forces, leaving the Marines and the General no choice but to abort their helicopter rescue at the original pick-up zone and embark upon a treacherous jungle journey through enemy territory, to a secondary pick-up zone. Along the way, the men transition into heroes, as they encounter an endless onslaught of horrific circumstances. In one scene, Ramon finds himself the sole protector of a Vietnamese woman and her daughter after Joe “Cowboy” Geer is shot to death by the communists he bravely fends off in order to give them a chance to escape. In another, Nick Govostos, American son of Greek immigrants, is called upon to make a gut-wrenching decision most of us will never have to confront in our lifetimes, when fellow soldier Darryl Huckins is brutally skinned alive.

Through it all, the men come to appreciate valor, courage, brotherhood and the price of freedom as they develop an understanding and respect for the man whose rescue comes with the highest of costs. Those who are fortunate enough to make it home in the end, have nothing but affection for their fallen heroes and the country that sent its young men into harm’s way for the cause of freedom. No wonder the power-brokers of Hollywood rejected this film!

Fortunately it is available as a DVD at
http://www.forgottenheroesthemovie.com.

A true patriot, Jack Marino is donating $5.00 to The American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial Fund for every copy purchased. Please support this wonderful film and our forgotten heroes!

-Daria Anne DiGiovanni

- Author of the book, Water Signs: A Story of Love and Renew



"Apocalypse Now has the big movie stars. Platoon has the budget. Full Metal Jacket has Kubrick. But Forgotten Heroes has the truth. And when history does what history always does best and shakes itself loose of the blistering lies told of and about America's involvement in Vietnam, it will be Jack Marino's Forgotten Heroes that's first acquitted.

 
Watching the history of Vietnam through the eyes of mainstream Hollywood you'd never know our goal was to help a people retain their self-determination. You'd never know that what the critics wrist-flicked as a civil war was in fact a national act of fratricide; one brother trying to oppress and butcher another. You'd never know the consequence of our leaving -- our breaking our promise to our allies -- our caving to the anti-war left -- was a holocaust of millions. And you'd never know that our men and women over there were honorable, self-sacrificing, heroes. You'd never know this because in order to present its twisted view of the war mainstream Hollywood must demonize our troops. It must lie.
 
In Forgotten Heroes we finally see an honest portrayal of these good and decent men who left their homes and risked their lives for something bigger than themselves. Marino's film reminds us how that once meant something. Marino's film also reminds us that when those men are forgotten by a government unwilling to finish what it started, the price they pay doesn't end with the war.
 
Using relatively unknown actors and a meager budget, Marino expertly mixes themes larger than politics with a briskly paced emotional story and action scenes that defy that meager budget. And watching Forgotten Heroes is a reminder of just how far Hollywood has fallen.
 
There was a time Hollywood believed in spreading liberty and stopping tyranny. There was a time it marshaled every force at its disposal because it believed everyone, regardless of skin color or religion, deserved freedom. That belief died sometime in the late 1960's. And from it sprang an ideology of anti-Americanism and pro-Communism that has infested our films for forty years and lives on today in the form of Michael Moore, Oliver Stone, and all the others who find the tyrants Castro and Saddam more tolerable than our own President.
 
But that's just politics. We can disagree on politics. But what about the men? Why must the heroes of Vietnam be slandered in film after film to support the misguided political agendas of the Hollywood left?  Can't we draw a line of decency somewhere?
 
Well, Marino has drawn a line. He put his money and talent and reputation on the line to tell the truth about these men. And for over fifteen years he's  shown this film to anyone willing to listen. Anyone with enough of an open mind to consider that there are still stories left untold in Vietnam. Stories of heroism and sacrifice. In other words: The Truth.
 
Every viewing of Forgotten Heroes makes these heroes less forgotten. Every viewing jabs a finger in the eye of a Hollywood that lies about them. The forgotten heroes of Vietnam have a friend in Jack Marino. And so do maverick filmmakers everywhere with a dream. With a love of country. With a love of freedom. With a love of truth."

-John Nolte - Editor in Chief / Big Hollywood

"The patriotic-movie Forgotten Heroes is a pleasant surprise. And what do I mean by that? This Vietnam War era movie portrays the courage and conviction that was present with American troops during the war, but never told by Hollywood. Forgotten Heroes is not a pop-culture movie depiction of American troops as out-of-control, mindless baby killers. Instead, Forgotten Heroes brings to life the story-line of a defecting Russian general and what a certain platoon had to endure to bring him safely into American hands.

The platoon is ordered to go on a dangerous mission to bring the defecting enemy-general into camp. Superb character actor, William Smith plays this Russian general, complete with his knowledge of the Russian language. A small but interesting part of the movie has Smith speaking Russian, with English sub-titles.

In keeping true with America’s demographics, creator and director, Jack Marino features the reality of the Vietnam War with excellent actors of Hispanic, African-American and Caucasian ethnicity. Every character is believable and together they mold into a tight group of warriors who care and lookout for each other.

This action packed film is interspersed with rock-n-roll music from the Vietnam War years. Forgotten Heroes takes the audience to a patriotic level unseen in any movie that has been made about the Vietnam War. This pro-American film will leave you feeling good about the noble cause that the United States undertook during the nearly two decades long war.

Forgotten Heroes is the lone cinematic answer to the several films that are anti-American regarding Vietnam. Forgotten Heroes is the welcome home movie for American troops. And we can thank Jack Marino for this recent DVD re-release of Forgotten Heroes and for his effort to fulfill the healing and emotional need that this film provides."
 

-Marc Stockwell-Moniz - Author/Historian/Lecturer

- Chandler's Watch Radio Show American Historian


"I am watching FORGOTTEN HEROES again tonight and am reminded of what a beautiful, heartfelt film it is. You've seen it so many times it's impact may be lost on you. It's truly a great film, beautifully shot. I loved the nods to Errol Flynn, particularly the incredible scene where the surfer has been tortured and asks the Greek to kill him. It reminded me of the great scene in Objective Burma - but you took it further and the emotional impact was profound. 

I don't know if it was an intentional make-up choice but Bill Smith, in this film, looks like Flynn, circa THE SUN ALSO RISES/ROOTS OF HEAVEN. When I see Smith in this film - with this character - I see Errol Flynn. I feel every Flynn fan would want that movie just for the various nods to Flynn in the picture... the park location on the old Flynn's estate, the score, the swordfighting in shadows, the quotes from Objective Burma. 

I have made over 35 movies in my career. I have always wanted to make a film that would affect people lives in a profound and positive way. I haven't yet done so. I've often said I'd give up my career if I could make one film like that. You did it right out of the gate.

I am and continue to be in awe of your passion and envious of your talent." 

- Steve Latshaw, Writer, Producer, Director 


"Hey Jack, First of all- LOVED YOUR INTERVIEW! (Great head of hair you got there, love that color, and it complements the bust of Errol Flynn beautifully!)

You did a wonderful job in getting across your love and passion for the film in a both moving and low key presentation. It wasn't a "sell" but more an open ended conversation in which your naturalness and ease came through.

The film, itself, is a REMARKABLE effort. Flawlessly photographed, brilliantly edited, not to mention its extraordinary composition and juxtaposition of images (when the story called for it) as in one action or sequence leading into another. It had a 60s movie flavor to it (best way I could describe it) only that's where the comparison ends-  technically SUPERIOR in terms of its overall execution.

William Smith was absolutely MARVELOUS ... moving way far away and beyond his B movie tough guy type casting. A GREAT job of acting! Only watched it once but look forward to a second viewing ...  And GREAT JOB credits go to you, Jack! 

You've done yourself, and the time, and especially the people who LIVED THAT TIME proud! You captured the very ESSENCE of the feeling of it all- and THAT is no SMALL feat just by itself! But on top of that, you told a wonderful and moving story with truth and sensitivity!

CONGRATS on your TREMENDOUS accomplishment- and against the odds you persevered! I SALUTE YOU!
"

--Karl Holmberg, NY - Writer

"I really liked Forgotten Heroes!  What a beautiful 35mm transfer; every minute that went by I thought about all the problems of 35 and how the heck did Jack overcome this and that and the other?  How did you afford to get all that film processed?  How did you light the night scenes?  That lighting was beautiful.  Was that the Carolina memorial at Gettysburg that I saw in the opening series of shots?  Did you shoot in PA?  I liked the ensemble cast a lot, and the story a lot.


You know what though.  I wish this had just been marketed as a straight actioner because I think it's just confusing to market it as a tribute to vets of The Nam.  You know, Mission to Moscow or something that would appeal to the grindhouse crowd.  It's got plenty of action and color and character to play that circuit, and I was always confused by the title, packaging, and your description.  I'd wonder, what was I going to see?  A documentary?  A syrupy tribute?  No, it's kick-ass throwback action movie, and I think on that basis it would do well.  You know how they say, "You have to be able to boil your movie down to a sentence."  Elevator speech, that kind of thing.  And in my mind your movie would be, "It's a Vietnam action adventure about a group of guys on an impossible mission."  I don't think pro-Vietnam, anti-Vietnam really enters into it so much as, it's a macho action movie.  Maybe the argument that Nam soldiers have all been portrayed negatively was relevent 20 years ago, but I don't think it's relevent now.  That's my 2 cents.  I liked it a lot, and I'm a tough critic.  I was on the edge of my seat through the last reel and a half.
 
I mean, really, Jack, you pulled off a miracle as an independent warrior filmmaker, simulating jungle, flying in helos, pyrotechnics, blood effects--you had it all!! A double and triple Congratulations!"

-Robert Matzen, PA - Author-Writer-Filmmaker



"As a Vietnam veteran I can tell you that you have captured the essence of every platoon, and squad and small unit that ever served over there. I led an infantry platoon of the 1st Air Cavalry Division and I had a little bit of every one of your characters in the guys in my unit. What a pleasure to see in your film was that you didn't cop out to the clichés of most of the movies out on the war with the standard atrocities and racial, drug, psycho themes. The kids in your movie are just like the tens of thousands of 19 year olds who served over there. And there were hundreds of small unit missions with heroics such as you portrayed in your film, many which have been long been forgotten because of security classifications, and quite frankly, time because people back home just didn't want to hear about it anymore. It's good to see the Vietnam soldiers and marines presented in a positive light for a change."

- R. Flynn - Platoon Leader 1st Air Cav Division - Vietnam 66-67



"After seeing your film "Forgotten Heroes" I can say that your concept of American's helping Russians is far ahead of its time. Who would have known then the the United States and our former adversaries could be friends and work together for world peace. William Smith's performance of a Russian officer is outstanding and gives insight to some of the attitudes that prevailed in the former Soviet Union. The actors who portray the "Forgotten Heroes" show that young American warriors will give their all to carry out the mission in spite of overwhelming odds. We wish you success with your film, it is one that shows Americans serving in Vietnam in a positive light. Thank you for that."

- Vaughn Binzar - Editor/Art Director - Bravo Veterans Outlook

- U.S. Army Vietnam veteran, 1965-66


"Forgotten Heroes" is a time capsule of what a unit of ten men witnessed deep in the Vietnam War jungles my generation only read about and is still trying to understand almost 30 years later. "Forgotten Heroes" is an excellent portrait of some of the Vietnam war experience America's young men and women of the time endured fighting a war that many at home questioned and protested. The talented and charismatic cast portrays a believable mixture of Americans who came from many racial/ethnic backgrounds and fought together in the Vietnam war."

-Tom Hickey - Movie/TV Marketing Magazine


"Forgotten Heroes", is a film with a thought provoking title which offers the possibilities of a Vietnam era movie with a slightly different slant to it. "Forgotten Heroes" depicts the war with less emphasis on the graphic violence, language and emotional trama You might call it the "Kelly's Heroes" of Vietnam war films. Until now we have been brainwashed into believing all the men who fought in "the Nam" were drug using, psychotic, women and children killers, sometimes resorting to the unforgivable crime of "fragging" their own superior officers. Vietnam vets everywhere know that just isn't true. Which is why so many of them who have reportedly found it refreshing in that it goes against the grain of other more celebrated films of the past decade. "Forgotten Heroes" is in no danger of sweeping the Academy Awards. But at the same time, the film was refreshing and entertaining and in a day of multi-million dollar extravaganzas spewing out of Hollywood at an almost dizzying rate, a respectable low budget film that entertains is a rarity."

-Mike Merrett - Everett/Malden Daily News Mercury


"Forgotten Heroes" is a good, solid, old-fashioned entertainment in a Vietnam setting without the distorted stereotypes of drug addicts, murderers, and rapist. I particularly liked the ending with President Kennedy's Inaugural ceremony pledge to defend freedom anywhere, anytime, at any cost. It was not only very effective but helped to put our Southeast Asian involvement in context. "

-Joseph N. Smith Director

- Department of Military and Veterans Affairs

- County of Los Angeles


"I was very pleased for the opportunity of watching Jack Marino's film "Forgotten Heroes." Despite its obvious flaws and shortcomings - - many of them related to the movie's extremely low budget - - "Forgotten Heroes" struck me as a heartfelt piece of filmmaking that delivers a few moments of genuine power. I'm looking forward to screening and reviewing Mr. Marino's future work."

-Michael Medved - co-host SNEAK PREVIEWS

- WTTW Chicago - PBS TV


"Forgotten Heroes" is a feature film about the Vietnam War. Producer/Director Jack Marino made this film to dramatize the underlying reason for this war, which was a confrontation between freedom and communism. Freedom is portrayed by the desire of a Russian General, played by William Smith, to defect and the supreme sacrifice of the platoon that went into Cambodia to rescue him. What is unusual about this film is not that it is a positive portrayal of the American soldiers that served their country and the cause of freedom, but that the film shows heroism of the Vietnam war veterans.


By putting an American platoon against a Soviet squad, Producer/Director Jack Marino achieves a great cinematic feat, since for the first time as a movie audience we can see what the Vietnam war was all about. It was not about killing Vietnamese farmers, oppressed by an ancient feudal system that was supported by communism, but a fight between Soviet communism and American democracy. In scene after scene the drama is played out, the apparent contradiction between the aim of the American Platoon in fighting for their life, yet risking death to rescue an enemy general. The stark realism of this movie and its climatic sequence makes this film a very unique experience for all audiences, but especially for the children of the Vietnam veterans who can see for the first time a movie that portrays their fathers as heroes no longer forgotten.


The last sequence of the movie is a classic of the independent cinema. Demand to see this film in your theaters, you won't regret it. "Forgotten Heroes" is a movie for those who no longer need to regret that the Vietnam war veterans have not been properly recognized."

-Victor Alexander - Independent filmmaker and author


"Platoon", "Pearl Harbor", make room for "FORGOTTEN HEROES" very well produced,directed and REAL. After viewing this Vietnam war film (five times) I actually thought I was in the action, with the troops in Nam. When "F.H." reaches the BIG silver screens, it will definately draw huge fans of the war/drama genre and then some. William Smith's portrayal as a Russian officer is flawless, the direction by Jack Marino is perfect! Reminds me of the movie "BATAAN", gut wrenching suspense, and ALL ACTION!"

- Anthony Cardoza - Producer, Director,Writer, Actor


"Jack, I received my copy of FORGOTTEN HEROES and enjoyed it immensely. Thank you again for bringing this wonderful film to the world. And to my attention. Its refreshing to see a movie of this caliber and integrity. I put you and the film right up there with John Wayne and the GREEN BERETS. I know you must have sweated blood all these years in your effort to get this film made. The cast was terrific and Mr Smith, as always, was excellant in his portrayel of the General. I only wish DeLuca could have made it home. Good job and thanks again."
 

-Bob Hubbard — Vietnam Vet USAF -1966


"Jack, I watched Forgotten Heroes last night. I have to say it is NOT anything I expected. I sat there....watching...thinking...and it never turned into anything close to any Nam movie I have ever seen. Which is GOOD! At first it had a few funny parts...Sure shot Charlie--ha ha, too funny. Of course I got off track when you entered the Tent boasting about leaving soon, and it became LESS of a movie for me, and more of a "LOOK! THERE IS JACK!! AWE AWE!!!" Then you had to go and get your damn boots polished and blown up! But---just as the guys were making a historical reference to the short timers stick---not ONE of them went running after the kids to take out revenge for your death---I think thats when I noticed things were different in the movie. So here is my final say on your movie---because after I watched it, I watched it again! ha ha ha. Hey--I wanted to make sure my first observations were CORRECT---I am picky that way.
 
"The Movie Forgotten Heroes depicts the honor and integrity of each soldier as a MAN without political bias. The reflection is more of the spirit and core of the soldier. It exemplifies the humanistic value of life and the duty to give up one's life for another. Each soldier regardless of country, background, or circumstances offers dignity to the fallen. In the end, the men who fought, will always cherish and remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice---even if the rest of the world forgets. The brave heroes were simply MEN."

-Brenda Freeman CEO/Community Connection

"Not gone, but definitely not Forgotten: Americans and beyond, modern conservatives and otherwise, the time now exists to throw support behind a movie that speaks to what those in Hollywood would not have us believe: US soldiers are not bloodthirsty, psychopathic and/or drug-addicted thugs. While set in Vietnam, Jack Marino's Forgotten Heroes plays more like the WWII movies of old and not so old (think Kelly's Heroes and Invasion U.S.A.): The wide variety of ethnic and social types, boys away from home for the first time paired with seasoned veterans and an enemy whose only nuance stems from his wanting to defect from the Soviet Union to the United States because of its greatness (don't worry, though, as the other Soviets and Vietnamese don't endure the throes of moral confusion so present in today's war movies and are easily recognized for the enemy they were).
 
Marino's long road to release for Forgotten Heroes (it was shot in 1988-89) comes after having Hollywood's doors slammed in his face, time and again. Sadly, even conservative film festivals, ones that routinely show films from the 1940s and 50s, would not allow Jack to screen his movie in their lineups in recent years, stating that Forgotten Heroes was "too old." Whatever. The ball (or DVD as it is) now rests in your court, to cop a phrase, my fellow Americans (and our freedom loving friends). Now it is your turn to show Hollywood that Brian DePalma, Paul Haggis and Oliver Stone are hacks when it comes to their portrayals of the US soldier (yes, their recent box office returns indicate that as well). Praised by Vietnam and Gulf War combat veterans alike, Forgotten Heroes takes you back to a time when you didn't have to be embarrassed to enjoy the US doing what we do best: winning. You know, when we were allowed to win. To make the purchase of Forgotten Heroes even better, Jack and his producers will donate $5 of every sale of the movie to the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial Fund. Hear that, Eddie Vedder, ALL disabled veterans, not just the ones who oppose the war they signed up to fight.
Simply go to www.forgottenheroesthemovie.com to learn more about Forgotten Heroes and make the purchase. On behalf of Jack and the Forgotten Heroes team, we thank you."

-Eric "Mr.EPluribus" Porvaznik,- Modern Conservative.com

"I would highly recommend it to other Nam Vets for sure! Thanks Jack for showing us in a different light than we normally are. One thing you can surely do is to say that the first Nam Vet to watch it will guarantee that all that I have read about FORGOTTEN HEROES is true and highly recommended by me Mike Rozar, Combat Vietnam Veteran, 1970/1971 Americal Division. I think you did an awesome job on the movie Jack! Thanks again for sticking by your guns and putting this out for the Vietnam Vets!"

- Mike Rozar, Combat Vietnam Veteran,

1970/1971 Americal Division


"Lauding Jack Marino’s Forgotten Heroes movie, heroes are forgotten no more.  Star William Smith is well remembered from his role in TV’s “Laredo,” prompting happy girlhood memories of a time when I watched him every chance, fascinated by the width of his shoulders and his sinewy neck.  It was good to see in Marino’s film that Smith’s physical assets had not been figments of my imagination — still a hunk!- and now watching Marino’s film, having matured myself, I note that Smith’s talent is also apparent.  His portrayal of the Russian officer conveys the conflicts of loyalty that gripped the times and adds a level of intrigue that is usually limited to Cold War flicks.

An added bonus is Marino’s expanded “cameo” (far exceeding any camera time Hitchcock or Truffaut ever indulged, but when it’s your movie, that’s your “perk,” right?  If I ever get to make a film, say about Joan of Arc or Margaret Thatcher or Wonder Woman, yours truly has the lead all tied up!). 

Forgotten Heroes  reminds us that we just cannot forget the bravery and literal self sacrifice that our American armed services made then.  It is at our peril if we do.  Thanks, Jack, for remembering and acting to ensure that our heroes then and now are forgotten no more.  You’re film is beyond great!"

- Texacalirose / Internet Blogger - Big Hollywood


"Hello Jack, I liked "Forgotten Heroes" very much, just watched it this Sunday. Willliam Smith's performance as General Strelnikov was gorgeous. I also liked the other actors very much. A really good cast, very convincing. I remember Johnny Johnson ( and David Campbell, I think, too) appeared also in "Hell on the Battleground", another Bill Smith war movie, which came out around the same time. I also enjoyed your appearance in "Forgotten Heroes" but you disappeard much too soon. The action scenes were excellent, the whole story was fine. The sword fight scene was great when you showed only their shaddows fighting. A fine tribute to the legendary Errol Flynn. The gunshots looked very realistic and the helicopter scenes impressed me very much. Very emotional and dramatic ending (Bill died in a lot of his movies) but this makes your movie unforgettable. No, these heroes are not forgotten. I also liked the titel song "Forgotten Heroes" at the end credits very much. Great female singer, great voice. What I also liked very much was that this was a real movie and William Smith was in almost every scene not like this direct to video films where he was one day on the set and the movie was cut around him. I hope you will earn enough money with the DVD to produce and direct your next movie. How long were you shooting? You had the original versions of "California Dreaming" from the Mamas and the Papas, "Eve of Destruction" from Barry McGuire and "Live for Today" from The Grass Roots. Were the rights for this songs very expensive ?
 
How long did you work on "Forgotten Heroes" from the Pre- to the Post-Production ?"

 

-Wolf Hell - Filmmaker ,Vennia, Austria

YOU CAN "WELCOME HOME" ALL VIETNAM VETERANS WITH YOUR PURCHASE OF FORGOTTEN HEROES. THIS ONE ACT OF SUPPORT SENDS A MESSAGE TO EACH OF THEM. THAT YOU SUPPORT THEM AND YOU DISAGREE ON HOW THEY WERE TREATED WHEN THEY CAME BACK HOME. "WELCOME HOME BROTHERS WELCOME HOME"

BUY THE DVD NOW

Contactjack@forgottenheroesthemovie.com